September Update - Typewriters & Fairy Tale Kick-off at the Loft

Well, summer has come to its inevitable close. It was an very productive couple of months, and I'm at a point in my novel revisions where I'm close to sending things off to my agents for their thoughts. As one of my previous updates noted, I've also been experimenting with new writing habits in the spirit of productivity and slaying the procrastination beast (esp. important during the school year when my writing time is limited). It occurred to me that with all the apps I've been using to limit my use of the Internet during writing sessions that my Macbook had become a glorified typewriter, so I figured why not just use a typewriter? A few other positives that I considered for using a typewriter for first drafts and notes: 1) I'm forced to push forward no matter what, 2) minimal distractions, 3) the ability transform my office into an electronics free zone unless I really, really need to look up something. 

Logroño_-_Casa_de_las_Ciencias_-_Exposición_'100_años_de_periodismo_en_La_Rioja'_-_Olivetti_Studio_44.jpg

 

After much research, I ended up buying an Olivetti Studio 44 (circa 1965), which also happened to be a machine used by William S. Burroughs, Raymond Chandler, Ralph Ellison, and Tennessee Williams. I guess lineage of certain models is another charming thing about typewriters apart from their mechanical impressiveness/elegance. As Obi Wan Kenobi said, "An elegant weapon for a more civilized age." It'll take some getting used to (my fingers will have to strike harder, my hands will need to be tilted at a higher angle, and I'll have to consider typing speed to avoid jams), but I foresee a long relationship with this machine. 

 

 

 

 

In other news, The Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis will be kicking off a season of fairy tales this fall. I'll be discussing fairy tales in November as part of an event devoted to fairy tales for adults. Looking ahead to this and other events, I chatted with The Loft for their podcast where I read my story, "The Peach Boy", a continuation of the famous Japanese tale of the same name (Momo Taro in Japanese) and talked a bit about why fairy tales and folklore and monsters have been a part of my literary jam for so long. See link here to listen. 

Screen Shot 2018-09-08 at 8.11.39 PM.png
Sequoia Nagamatsu